Latest News

Plantar fasciitis treated in just 3 weeks with Low Level Laser Therapy

Many patients are now turning to Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) to help treat their plantar fasciitis. LLLT is appealing because it is painless, non-invasive, free from side effects and provides substantial relief in relatively short periods of time. Conservative treatments such as rest, stretching, physical therapy, foot orthotics, corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can take upwards of 10 months to provide relief, however a new study has found Low Level Laser Therapy can work in as little as 3 weeks. The study published in the Foot and Ankle International Journal and found that LLLT was more effective than placebo for reducing pain, improving function and reversing tissue damage in chronic plantar fasciitis. The participants in the study had suffered from plantar fasciitis for over 12 months, none of which had responded to conservative therapy. Each participant was asked to rate their pain on a scale of 0 – 100 (0 = no pain; 100 = extreme pain). Prior to laser therapy, the average pain level was 69.2 out of 100. After just 6 treatments (2 treatments per week for 3 weeks), the pain level had decreased to 39.6 out of 100 (44.2% decrease in pain), compared to placebo which decreased to just 62.3 out of 100 (7.5% decrease in pain). At a 6 month follow up, patients who had received LLLT reported an average pain level of 12.3 out of 100. The patients were re- assessed at 12 months and reported an average pain level of just 6.9 out of 100. Ultrasounds were also performed before and after treatment and showed significant tissue regeneration of the plantar fascia compared to placebo. These findings support the use of LLLT as a promising treatment for plantar fasciitis.
May. 26, 2017
healing

Plantar fasciitis treated in just 3 weeks with Low Level Laser Therapy

Many patients are now turning to Low Level Laser Therapy (LLLT) to help treat their plantar fasciitis. LLLT is appealing because it is painless, non-invasive, free from side effects and provides substantial relief in relatively short periods of time. Conservative treatments such as rest, stretching, physical therapy, foot orthotics, corticosteroid injections and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs can take upwards of 10 months to provide relief, however a new study has found Low Level Laser Therapy can work in as little as 3 weeks. The study published in the Foot and Ankle International Journal and found that LLLT was more effective than placebo for reducing pain, improving function and reversing tissue damage in chronic plantar fasciitis. The participants in the study had suffered from plantar fasciitis for over 12 months, none of which had responded to conservative therapy. Each participant was asked to rate their pain on a scale of 0 – 100 (0 = no pain; 100 = extreme pain). Prior to laser therapy, the average pain level was 69.2 out of 100. After just 6 treatments (2 treatments per week for 3 weeks), the pain level had decreased to 39.6 out of 100 (44.2% decrease in pain), compared to placebo which decreased to just 62.3 out of 100 (7.5% decrease in pain). At a 6 month follow up, patients who had received LLLT reported an average pain level of 12.3 out of 100. The patients were re- assessed at 12 months and reported an average pain level of just 6.9 out of 100. Ultrasounds were also performed before and after treatment and showed significant tissue regeneration of the plantar fascia compared to placebo. These findings support the use of LLLT as a promising treatment for plantar fasciitis.
May. 26, 2017
laser-condition

Low Level Laser Therapy for Plantar Fasciitis

The plantar fascia is a dense fibrous band of connective tissue which originates the heel bone and extends to the toes. It frames the arch of the underside of the foot and plays an integral role in absorbing and dissipating the forces associated with standing, walking, jumping and running. The plantar fascia endures substantial mechanical stress and tension whenever the foot bears weight. As a result, the plantar fascia can weaken and become overstretched, resulting in micro-tears, degeneration and thickening of the fascia. This condition is known as plantar fasciitis. The main symptom of plantar fasciitis is a sharp and stabbing pain in the heel. The pain typically worsens throughout the day, especially with increased activity. If left untreated, other symptoms such as weakness, swelling, numbness and tingling of the foot can develop. Whilst there are a range of conservative treatments available (rest, ice packs, stretching, physical therapy, foot orthotics, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) these treatments are often met with frustration as they take up to 12 months to provide relief. About 10% of patients with plantar fasciitis elect to undergo invasive procedures however these are associated with significant risks. For example, corticosteroid injections can rupture the plantar fascia, whilst surgery can lead to infection, rupture of the plantar fascia, loss of function, reduced stability and recurring pain. Many patients are now turning to LLLT to help treat their plantar fasciitis because it is painless, non-invasive, free from side effects and provides substantial relief in relatively short periods of time. LLLT is unlike any other therapy because it not only provides pain relief, but it also targets the underlying cause of the problem, rather than masking the symptoms. LLLT does this through reducing pain and inflammation, stimulating collagen synthesis in tendons and ligaments, blocking pain signalling and promoting blood flow to the affected area.
May. 26, 2017